Tag Archives: interview

Why Should Someone Work for You – The Company Interview

As Spring hire season fast approaches, many companies are ramping up their recruitment strategies to ensure that they onboard the best talent.  At the same time, the number of eligible workers applying for jobs will also increase. The pool of candidates will include students, recent graduates, and also individuals who are looking to make a career transition. With such a large pool of candidates, top talent is inevitably mixed into the crowd.

standout in a crowdIt’s common to think as an employer ‘they want/need the job, they need to prove themselves worthy in an interview,’ however this is a serious misconception. In order to attract top talent, a fit must be established.  Employers need to express their need for top talent, and why a potential candidate should work for them. It’s a two way street.  Companies need to clearly establish what makes their organization a great place to work.

Here are 3 things to add into the interview process to explain why someone should want to work for you:

1. Skip the usual job description only advertisementYes, it’s easy to copy and paste the job description, add the location, a salary range and expected start date – but this is not a way to attract top talent.  Here’s a look at some of the information available to candidates on Coca-cola Company’s career page:

What do we offer

  • The Coca-Cola Company’s extraordinary heritage, our leading brands and the global scale of what we do;
  • The challenge of meaningful work – our unique global system offers constant opportunities to develop world-class skills and a truly international career;
  • A unique culture where people convert their passion into action;The kind of competitive compensation you would expect from a world leader.
  • The kind of competitive compensation you would expect from a world leader.
  • View our infographic:  Coca-Cola At A Glance

What do we expect from you

  • The ability to contribute, to make a difference and have a tangible impact – turning your passion into action;
  • Creative and fresh thinking in your work and your life, regardless of your role;
  • A spirit of collaboration – you thrive when you work with a diverse range of people with different views, perspectives and priorities;
  • A pragmatic and commercial mindset that understands the challenge of sustainability.

Top Reasons to work for The Coca-Cola Company

  1. Ability to make a difference
  2.  Ability to grow
  3. We want to become…
  4. We have embarked on a strategic journey…
  5. Values
  6. Be part of a diverse team
  7. One-of-a-kind experiences
  8. A unique culture
  9.  Accessibility to more than just a Company…
  10. Rewarding environment

The company has further written and visual material explaining the top 10 reasons to work for them.  This creates interest for potential top talent, and allows candidates to see whether a fit could exist.  It provides a rich picture of the company that captures the interest of readers.  Keep in mind that these readers could be anyone, including future employees, people who might refer the job to a friend or family member, or even employees of your competitors who may be looking for their next move.  This type of information should be shared throughout the entire interview process to keep the candidates interested and excited of the possibility to work with you!

2.  Provide valuable information to candidates when selected for an interview  – Provide candidates who are selected for interviews with PDF brochures or links to informational video’s for them to familiarize themselves with the company’s values and mission.  Set yourself apart from companies who merely ask if a candidate is available for an interview at a set date and time, and create a fit earlier in the process.  This makes the selection process more refined, as it will be easier to identify top talent – those who are prepared and a great fit with the company.

3.  Once a fit has been established and the ideal candidate has been selected, maintain and strengthen the employment relationship – Don’t let time constraints and fatigue of the interview selection process tire you out. Recruitment isn’t complete once an offer has been accepted.  Most employees quit within the first two weeks of employment if they do not identify a fit with the company.  This means ensuring that the on-boarding process has as much information and support for the candidate as promised prior to employment.  Provide them with resources and tools that will help them settle into their new role. For example, provide the names and phone numbers of key contact points in the organization.  Conduct a performance review two weeks into employment to see how the new employee is doing.

Remember that the job search process is a two-way street, both for the employer and candidate.  Each party has their own  wants  and needs — the goal is to establish a fit, to create a long lasting employment relationship.

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Organizational Culture

corporate culture

by John Kobrossy

In popular culture, the “typical” office environment is usually presented as a blandly decorated field of cubicles, including the common staples of bad coffee and a water cooler. These factors come to form everyone’s default standard perception of corporate culture. In reality, though, corporate culture is so much more than that.

The corporate culture of an organization is defined by the views of the founder or by upper management and top executives. It is the shared values and visions that drive a company and it can be a great indicator of whether or not a company could be a good fit for you.

In order to understand the corporate culture and determine whether it will be a good fit for you, you should do as much research as you can. The following list of tips will get you started.

Company Website:
Check out the company’s website, and pay special attention to the “about” page. It will likely tell you about their mission statements, their clients, how long they’ve been around, exactly what they do and how they do it. Be sure to read between the lines if you can.

Get Inside:
There are factors about the corporate culture than you can only learn by getting inside the doors. If possible, try to organize an opportunity for a job shadow. You can get a real feel for working there that you just can’t get online. For example, their company websites won’t communicate that at GoodLife Fitness, a majority of employees don’t wear ties to the office or that UPS has a clean shaven policy implemented from the top down. At first glance these things might not seem important, but if you look closely this shows you that GoodLife values comfort and a stress free environment and that UPS wants its employees to know that no one employee gets treated any differently from another.

The Interview:
A lot of us have gotten to that point at the end of an interview where the interviewer asks “Any questions for me?” It has happened to all of us, sometimes we just can’t think of a question. Keep in mind that great question can be “What can you tell me about the culture inside your organization?” This shows you’re already trying to get a sense of whether or not you’ll fit in with them. It makes you seem engaged and confident. Even better, you will be getting valuable information about the corporate culture straight from the source.

Don’t ignore the significance of organizational culture in your job search. The right fit can make the difference between loving and hating your job. Get engaged and seek out the company that complements you, you’ll thank yourself for it and your employers will thank you for it as well.

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Recruiting: Researching the Right Fit

-by Rebecca Garber, Human Resources/Recruitment Intern at Linkus Group

I have spent the past several months trying to gain a better understanding of the different recruitment services offered in Toronto. Sending copious emails, cold calling, and networking was the core of my daily research routine. After speaking to several individuals in the industry, I came to understand that their response or lack thereof, could be seen as a reflection of one’s personal style of recruitment.

One of my first emails was met with a rapid response, suggesting a time to meet the next day. Enthused by the immediacy of my success, I inquired about current job openings. When I received a simple yes, my excitement continued to grow. My initial inquiry into gaining more information had transformed into an interview; I had struck networking gold. Upon my arrival, I met with several individuals in the company. I spent the next several hours screening resumes, perfecting my sales techniques and making cold calls. Although these are all important functions of the recruiting process, the accelerated speed had me question the authenticity and potential longevity of this position.

On the flip side, there were several occasions where my efforts to make contact were not reciprocated. For instance, during one particular experience I finally received a response after weeks of persistence, only to be told that I did not have enough experience for the position. When I reiterated that I was simply interested in learning more about the firm, I still sensed hesitancy. To my surprise, I received a phone call later that week asking if I was available for a meeting. When I arrived at the appointment it was evident why my status had shifted to high priority. The individual I was meeting with felt that I would be an appropriate candidate to fill one of the current positions at the firm. As a potential candidate, the suddenness of this situation seemed very obvious to me and I felt slightly uncomfortable. Placing candidates is what recruiters do, but there is a way to do this so that your candidate doesn’t feel like a “pawn in a game”. It is important to be subtle about personal gain and emphasize benefits to the candidate. .

Although my requests were not always met with unprecedented altruism, I must say that I was pleasantly surprised by many of my interactions. I had the privilege of meeting with some extremely helpful and inspiring individuals. The fact that people were willing to spend time with me when there was no apparent immediate benefit, is an indication that they understood a very important principle. I believe it is difficult to find success unless one approaches all interactions with an element of foresight; something beneficial does not necessarily mean something immediate.

In the end, I found myself at Linkus Group; a recruiting/HR agency that structures client and candidate interactions, based on the principle of quality over quantity. Whether it is a personal job search or a recruiter in search of a suitable candidate, finding an appropriate and well-researched fit should never be comprised of the temporary satisfaction of simply filling the role.

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